My journey into the True Church – Timothy Copple, Texas, USA

http://havefaithorthodoxy.wordpress.com

HAVE FAITH – ORTHODOXY

My journey into the True Church

by Timothy Copple

Source:

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com/2010/07/my-journey-timothy-copple/

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

Each story I’ve heard of how people have come into the Orthodox Church has been different. Sometimes there are some general similarities, but each one has specific issues, specific circumstances and specific problems that they deal with. While I recognize that my own circumstances are not, and in some cases should not be, how others come into Orthodoxy, I do feel there were some key elements that moved me in this direction. Most inquirers/converts to Orthodoxy will deal with these key elements at some point.

So allow me to tell you a little of my own journey.

I was born and raised in Texas. We moved a lot, so over my growing up years I’ve lived in several different cities around south-central Texas. The city that I did a majority of my growing up, mostly during my teen years, was Austin, TX. So I tend to think of that as “home”. Ironically, it was in moving back to Austin after having lived in other places for around 16 years that I became Orthodox.

As I was growing up, my Father, Dalton Copple, was a part-time Baptist preacher while he worked for the local electric company around the Uvalde area. Some of my earliest memories as a kid are from those days. I recall a couple of questions I had back then, which I addressed to my Mom, Alice Fay Kiker.

One time I recall, as we were getting dressed for church, asking Mom why we had to go to church. As many people know, kids are often not really excited about going to church. You want to move, you want to play, you want to do anything but sit in a pew and listen for over an hour to people saying words and singing music. For me, however, that was not the full motivation behind my question. It was those blasted black leather shoes.

We were pretty poor people, but of course being the pastor’s family, the kids had to have decent looking shoes for church. Only problem was that our feet were constantly growing and Mom knew that we would hardly get a pair broke in before we would need a new pair. So, like any Mom aware that she had to Continue reading “My journey into the True Church – Timothy Copple, Texas, USA”

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The Shaman and the Saint

http://nativeamericansmetorthodoxy.wordpress.com

NATIVE AMERICANS MET ORTHODOXY

The Shaman and the Saint

St. Innocent, Equal to the Apostles had an illustrious career – he began as a simple missionary priest to the Aleut people of Alaska, and wound up as Metropolitan of Moscow. But even though he was an important and influential man, he was humble and unassuming, very aware of his failings and his temptations. Because of this, St. Innocent managed to miss meeting angels.

St. Innocent’s first parish was a series of islands spread over 1700 miles of the Bering Sea. He and his family settled on Unalaska Island, and he made a point of traveling by kayak and ship to as many islands and villages as he could during the year to attend to the needs of his parishioners.

In April of 1828, some people from Unimak Island arrived in Dutch Harbour. They had come to ask him if he would visit them. Unimak is about four hundred miles north east (as the crow flies) from Unalaska. He told the delegation that he’d be happy to come with them, but on the way, he wanted to stop at Akun Island, which lies halfway between Unalaska and Unimak.

We have to remember that in 1828, the telephone hadn’t been invented yet. Mail service was nonexistent, except when the company ships brought parcels and letters from Russia or Sitka, and in any case, the Aleut people, until St. Innocent arrived, hadn’t needed a written language, so they didn’t read or Continue reading “The Shaman and the Saint”

Saint Brendan the Navigator from Ireland to North America (+578)

Saint Brendan the Navigator

from Ireland to North America (+578)

“They that go down to the sea in ships, that do business in great waters;
These see the works of the Lord, and his wonders in the deep.”

Psalm 107:23-24

St Brendan the Navigator

St Brendan, The Navigator was born in Fenit Co. Kerry in 484. Educated by Bishop Erc in Kerry, set his skills to developing his knowledge to the art of ship building and the rules of the seas around Fenit Island. Building a simple boat made out of wood and leather, St Brendan set sail and discovered America in search of the Promised Land of the Saints. His journey and adventures were outlined in his journal the Navigatio Sancti Brendani which even inspired the Great Christopher Columbus himself on his voyage of discovery many years later.

SAINT BRENDAN THE NAVIGATOR

Our father among the saints Brendan was born about 484 AD to an Irish family near the present city of Tralee, County Kerry, Ireland. At a very young age he began his education in the priesthood and studied under St. Ita at Killeedy. Later he completed his studies under St. Erc, who ordained him in 512 AD.
During the next twenty years of his life, St. Brendan sailed all around the Islands surrounding Erie (Ireland), spreading the word of God and founding monastery after monastery. The most notable of these is Clonfert in Galway, which he founded around 557 AD, and which lasted well into the 1600s. St. Brendan died around 578 AD and his feast day is marked on May 16th.

Brendan’s first voyage took him to the Arran Islands, where he founded a monastery, and to many other islands which he only visited, including Hynba Island off Scotland, where he is said to have met Columcille (Columba). On this voyage he also traveled to Wales, and finally to Brittany, on the northern coast of France.

The event that St. Brendan is most celebrated for, however, is his voyage to the “Land of Promise”. Sometime in his early journeys, St. Brendan heard from another monk the story of a land far to the west, which the Irish claimed was a land of plenty.

He and a small group of monks including, possibly, St. Machutus, fasted for forty days, then set sail for this land in order to investigate and ‘convert’ the inhabitants. Altogether the journey took seven years.

In the ninth century, an Irish monk wrote an account of the voyage in the Navigatio Sancti Brendani (Voyage of St. Brendan). This book remained popular throughout the entire Middle Ages, and made Brendan famous as a voyager.

The account is characterized by a great deal of literary license and contains references to hell where “great demons threw down lumps of fiery slag from an island with rivers of gold fire” and “great crystal pillars”. Many now believe these to be references to the volcanic activity around Iceland, and to icebergs.

Upon reaching their destination, they engaged a guide who took them around the land. They went inland but were prevented from going further by a great river. Soon after this, St. Brendan, and the remainder of his colleagues sailed back to Ireland. Only a few survived the journey.

In modern times the story was dismissed as pure fabrication, but in the 1970′s a man named Tim Severin became fascinated with the story and decided to replicate St. Brendan’s journey. Severin built a boat made of hides tanned with oak bark just like the one described in the ancient text. The hides were sewn together over a bent frame of ash wood and the seams were sealed with animal fat and grease. With a group of volunteers he set sail for America and made his way to Newfoundland. His journey is covered in “The Brendan Voyage: Across the Atlantic in a Leather Boat”.

 

Tim Severin

The Brendan Voyage (1976–1977)

It is theorized by some scholars, that the Latin texts of Navigatio Sancti Brendani Abbatis (The Voyage of St. Brendan the Abbot) dating back to at least 800 AD tell the story of Brendan’s (c. 489–583) seven-year voyage across the Atlantic Ocean to a new land and his return. Convinced that the “Navigatio Sancti Brendani Abbatis (The Voyage of St. Brendan the Abbot)” was based in historical truth, in 1976 Severin built a replica of Brendan’s currach. Handcrafted using traditional tools, the 36-foot (11 m), two masted boat was built of Irish ash and oak, hand-lashed together with nearly two miles (3 km) of leather thong, wrapped with 49 traditionally tanned ox hides, and sealed with wool grease.

Between May 1976 and June 1977, Severin and his crew sailed the Brendan 4,500 miles (7,200 km) from Ireland to Peckford Island, Newfoundland, stopping at the Hebrides and Iceland en route. He considered that his recreation of the voyage helped to identify the bases for many of the legendary elements of the story: the “Island of Sheep”, the “Paradise of Birds”, “pillars of crystal”, “mountains that hurled rocks at voyagers”, and the “Promised Land”. Severin’s account of the expedition, The Brendan Voyage, became an international best seller, translated into 16 languages.

The boat is now featured at the Craggaunowen open-air museum in County Clare, Ireland.

Source: Wikipedia

Divina Liturgia de San Juan Crisóstomo – Traducción de padre Diácono José Santos ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* Spanish

https://divineliturgyexperiences.wordpress.com

EXPERIENCES DURING THE DIVINE LITURGY

DIVINA LITURGIA DE SAN JUAN CRISÓSTOMO

╰⊰¸¸.•¨*

TRADUCCIÓN DE

PADRE DIÁCONO JOSÉ SANTOS

Fuente:

https://sites.google.com/site/textosliturgicosortodoxos/

https://sites.google.com/site/textosliturgicosortodoxos/system/app/pages/recentChanges

https://sites.google.com/site/textosliturgicosortodoxos/eucologio/crisostomo

D Bendice, Padre.

S Bendito sea nuestro Dios en todo tiempo, ahora y siempre y por los siglos de los siglos.

D Amén.

Gloria a Ti, nuestro Dios, gloria a Ti.

Rey del cielo, Paráclito, Espíritu de Verdad. Tú que estas presente por todas partes y que lo llenas todo, tesoro de gracias y donador de vida, ven y habita en nosotros, purifícanos de toda mancha y salva nuestras almas, Tú que eres bondad.

Santo Dios, Santo Fuerte, Santo Inmortal, ten piedad de nosotros. (3 veces)

Gloria al Padre y al Hijo y al Espíritu Santo, ahora y siempre y por los siglos de los siglos. Amén.

Santísima Trinidad, ten piedad de nosotros; Señor, acepta la expiación de nuestros pecados; Maestro, perdónanos nuestras iniquidades; Santo, visítanos y cura nuestras debilidades a causa de Tu Nombre.

Señor, ten piedad (3 veces). Gloria al Padre y al Hijo y al Espíritu Santo, ahora y siempre y por los siglos de los siglos. Amén.

Padre nuestro, que estás en los cielos, santificado sea tu Nombre, venga a nosotros tu Reino, hágase tu voluntad así en la tierra como en el cielo; nuestro pan de este día dánosle hoy y perdónanos nuestras deudas, así como nosotros perdonamos a nuestros deudores. Y no nos sometas a la tentación, mas líbranos del maligno.

S Porque a Ti pertenecen el reino, el poder y la gloria, Padre, Hijo y Espíritu Santo, ahora y siempre y por los siglos de los siglos.

D Amén. Ten piedad de nosotros, Señor ten piedad de nosotros, pues pecadores impotentes, Te dirigimos esta súplica: Señor, ten piedad de nosotros.

Gloria al Padre y al Hijo y al Hijo y al Espíritu Santo, ahora y siempre y por los siglos de los siglos. Amén.

Señor, ten piedad de nosotros, porque tenemos confianza en Ti, no te enojes contra nosotros y no te acuerdes de nuestras iniquidades, sino que, en Tu ternura, dirige desde ahora Tu mirada sobre nosotros y líbranos de nuestros enemigos. Porque Tú eres nuestro Dios y nosotros somos Tu pueblo, somos la Continue reading “Divina Liturgia de San Juan Crisóstomo – Traducción de padre Diácono José Santos ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* Spanish”

Personal Testimony to Archbishop Dimitris Incorrupt Relics, Texas, USA

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USA OF MY HEART

Wildflowers at the End of the Storm 1

Texas, USA

Arb._Dmitri_2.JPG

A Saint of our days:

Archbishop Dmitri Royster of Dallas & South USA

August 28, +2011

╰⊰¸¸.•¨*

Diocese of Dallas & the South:

Alabama, Arkansas, North Carolina, Florida,

South Carolina, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico,

Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas & Virginia

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230712.p

Vladika’s hands five days after his departure in 2011.

There was 105F outside – normal Texas summer.

His body was not embalmed.

Source:

http://www.pravoslavie.ru/english/

http://www.pravoslavie.ru/english/91288.htm

Vladika’s hands five days after his departure in 2011. There was 105F outside – normal Texas summer. His body was not embalmed.

Vladimir Grigorenko was the iconographer of St. Seraphim’s Orthodox cathedral in Dallas and a close friend of Archbishop Dimitri’s. He was present both at his funeral and the five days until his burial, and at his exhumation and reinterment on Friday.

* * *

Yesterday we put Archbishop Dmitri in his final resting place in St. Seraphim Cathedral in Dallas.

I was blessed to be a part of a team, which uncovered Vladika’s earthly remains and transferred them into new coffin to be buried in the crypt of the Resurrection Chapel and probably should offer some comments about these events.

It was Archbishop Dmitri wish and our deep desire that he would be buried on Continue reading “Personal Testimony to Archbishop Dimitris Incorrupt Relics, Texas, USA”

An interview with Orthodox writer Bev Cooke, Canada

http://protestantsmetorthodoxy.wordpress.com

PROTESTANTS MET ORTHODOXY

An interview with Orthodox writer Bev Cooke, Canada

by Tudor Petcu

Source:

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com

http://ourneytoorthodoxy.com/2016/07/an-interview-with-orthodox-writer-bev-cooke/

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

Tudor Petcu is a Romanian writer, graduate of the Faculty of Philosophy, University of Bucharest, Romania. He has published a number of articles related to philosophy and theology in different cultural and academic journals. His work focuses on the evolution of Orthodox spirituality in Western societies as well and he is going to publish a book of interviews with Westerners converted to Orthodoxy. In this article, he interviews Bev Cooke, a Canadian writer who converted to Orthodoxy.

* * *

TP: Given the fact that you are one of the most well-known orthodox thinkers and writers in the West, I think it would be very good if you could introduce yourself and present the way by which you have discovered the Orthodoxy. Why have you chosen the conversion to Orthodoxy and how do you understand the Orthodox spirituality as a way of living?

Bev Cooke: Thank you very much for those kind words, but I’m really not as famous or as wise as you say! There are a lot of people who are much wiser, and I learn from them every day!

I was born and raised in Toronto Ontario, Canada and was baptized into the Anglican church. My father, the son of a Protestant minister, was a tolerant and gentle atheist who actually taught me a lot about Christian behaviour – he was one of the gentlest, kindest, most accepting and loving men I’ve ever known. My mother left the Anglican church when I was about five (I don’t know why, she never told me). So I grew up in a very secular household, but was always conscious of God and of needing His love, His mercy and his presence in my life.

In my teens, I hung around with a group of Catholic kids, attended mass and the youth group, and almost converted until a kind and wise priest advised me first to explore my own faith, and then decide if I should be Catholic. So I did, and the plan to convert ended up being put on hold for over twenty years and I ended up Orthodox, not Catholic. I was, for a long time, happy and fulfilled in Continue reading “An interview with Orthodox writer Bev Cooke, Canada”

Saint John (Ivan) Smirennikov the Aleut of Alaska (+19th ce.)

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ORTHODOXY IS LOVE

Saint John (Ivan) Smirennikov the Aleut of Alaska (+19th ce.)

This Aleut Orthodox tribal elder was known as a local ‘shaman’ who cured illness and told fishermen where to find large catches, just as shaman had done throughout the Arctic since time immemorial.

St. Innocent arrived at Akun Island on June 12, 1828 (O.S.), on a trip from Unalaska to Unimak Island, some 400 miles to the east. This was nearly four years after St. Innocent had first arrived in Alaska. St. Innocent was surprised to note that the people of the island were waiting for him at the shore, dressed in their finest clothing. The islanders greeted him by name, even before he introduced himself to them. When he asked them why they were waiting for him and how they knew his name, he was told that their shaman had informed them of his coming. St. Innocent thought this strange, but as he went about his work on the island, he put the incident out of his mind. However, as the days progressed, it came to his attention that one of the elders of the island, who had diligently come to services, and had prepared for and received Holy Communion, was unhappy with him. St. Innocent, wishing to avoid all misunderstandings, called to meet the man, known as Ivan Smirennikov.

The meeting took place, and Smirennikov expressed dissatisfaction that St. Innocent hadn’t asked why the islanders called him a shaman, even though the title bothered Smirennikov. As it turns out, Smirennikov had been baptized by Hieromonk Makary, and after his departure, he told St. Innocent, he had continually been visited almost daily for thirty years by two bright figures, who taught him in the ways of the faith. He, in turn, shared this with the rest of the village. These figures would also sometimes tell him things that were going to happen, which is how the islanders knew that St. Innocent would be arriving and his name. St. Innocent was first curious to meet these two, and he asked Smirennikov if he could meet them as well, and while Smirennikov went to ask if this was permissable, St. Innocent thought the better of it, reasoning that there was no way that demons would spend thirty years instructing someone on matters of the Faith. Furthermore, he considered himself unworthy to come into the presence of these spirits, and that Smirennikov had demonstrated enough to him for him alone that he did not need to meet these spirits to believe.

Before leaving Akun, St. Innocent wrote all these things down, and had them attested to, in writing, by Smirennikov and by his translator, a man by the name of Ivan Pankov. Also, he instructed the Akun islanders to no longer call Smirennikov a shaman. He then sent a copy of his experiences and Smirennikov’s testimony to his bishop, Bishop Michael (Byrudov) of Irkutsk. A reply was eventually received; blessing St. Innocent to go and meet the spirits, should they still be appearing to Ivan Smirennikov on St. Innocent’s next visit to Akun. Unfortunately, by the time St. Innocent visited Akun again, the elder Smirennikov had reposed, and the Angels of Akun appeared to no one else.

Source:

http://arizonaorthodox.com/saints-north-america/ivan-smirennikov-aleut-elder/

ARIZONA ORTHODOX

Link: Orthodox Monastery of the Virgin Mary the Consolatory in Brownsburg (Chatham), Quebec, Canada

monastery-13-aug-2010-28_edited-2-2-1.png

http://www.monastere.org/Virgin_Mary_of_Consolation/Home.html

Orthodox Monastery of the Virgin Mary the Consolatory

in Brownsburg (Chatham), Quebec, Canada

Holy Monastery of Panagia Parigoritissa
Abbess Thekla
827 Chemin de la Carriere
Brownsburg (Chatham),
Quebec, J8G 1K7
CANADA
Tel: (450) 533-4313
Fax: (450) 533-1169

The Monastery – Click HERE

Chemin de la Carriere, Brownsburg (Chatham)- Click HERE

Brownsburg, Québec, Canada – Click HERE

Geloof is kracht, geen troost – Hellen Keller, VS (blind en doof) ╰⊰¸¸.•* Dutch

http://usaofmyheart.wordpress.com

USA OF MY HEART

Hellen Keller, VS (blind en doof):

“Geloof is kracht, geen troost”.

Faith is strength, not comfort – Hellen Keller, USA (blind & deaf)

http://usaofmyheart.wordpress.com

USA OF MY HEART

Hellen Keller, USA (blind and deaf):

“Faith is strength, not comfort”.